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Awards

The steps to earning the highest awards in Girl Scouting are rooted in the Girl Scout Leadership Experience and the three keys to leadership which are:

  • Discover: Girls understand themselves and their values and use their knowledge and skills to explore the world.
  • Connect: Girls care about, inspire, and team with others locally and globally.
  • Take Action: Girls act to make the world a better place.

Our Girl Scouts are contributing to their communities in outstanding ways as they work to make the world a better place. Some examples include: promoting literacy by establishing a library for a children’s organization and caring for the less fortunate by building and stocking food pantries.

These achievements are recognized through the Girl Scout Gold, Silver and Bronze Awards, as well as the P2P Brownie Spark Award.

Girl Scout Brownie P2P Spark Award

Spark AwardThe Girl Scout Brownie SPARK Award is the top leadership honor for a Girl Scout Brownie, beginning her path to active leadership. The SPARK adventure follows the 4 Steps to Action booklet. Girls will be encouraged and empowered as they take the lead to help someone in need. Along the way are experiences in goal setting, team building and decision-making. These concepts are stepping stones to achieving national Girl Scout Leadership Awards.

It is recommended that this award be worked on as a troop, encouraging positive group dynamics. Completing this award will help to prepare Girl Scout Brownies to earn their Girl Scout Bronze Award.

Girl Scout Bronze Award

Bronze Graphic1The Girl Scout Bronze Award, the highest honor a Girl Scout Junior can earn, requires her to learn the leadership and planning skills necessary to follow through on a project that makes a positive impact on her community.

Girls may work on the award as part of a troop or group.

Girls must be in grades 4-5 (or equivalent), be a registered Girl Scout Junior AND complete a Junior Journey!

  • Build your Girl Scout Junior team.
  • Explore your community.
  • Choose your Girl Scout Bronze Award project.
  • Make a plan.
  • Put your plan in motion.
  • Spread the word.

Below are  information packets, forms and an adult guide for the Girl Scout Bronze Award.

Girl Scout Silver Award

Silver Graphic

The Girl Scout Silver Award, the highest honor a Girl Scout Cadette can earn, represents a girl’s accomplishment in Girl Scouting and her community as she grows and works to improve her life and the lives of others.

Girls may work on the award as part of a troop or group.

Girls must be in grades 6-8 (or equivalent), be a registered Girl Scout Cadette AND complete a Cadette Journey!

  • Identify issues you care about.
  • Build your Girl Scout Silver Award team or decide to go solo.
  • Explore your community.
  • Pick your Silver Award project.
  • The Silver Award project must be done in the local community (beyond the Girl Scout community).
  • Develop your project.
  • Make a plan and put it into motion.
  • Reflect, share your story and celebrate.
  • Complete and submit your Silver Award Final Report.

In order to participate in the council-wide Girl Scout Silver Award Ceremony, a girl needs to complete her Silver Award and submit a Silver Award Final Report to the Triad Service Center no later than March 15.

Below are  information packets, forms and an adult guide for the Girl Scout Silver Award.

Check out our Silver and Gold Award Chat Session videos. More information can be found here.

Check out our new Silver and Gold Award ONLINE Adult Learning Opportunities here!

Girl Scout Gold Award

Gold Graphic1The Girl Scout Gold Award is the highest award that a Girl Scout Senior or Ambassador may earn. For many, the leadership skills, organizational skills and sense of community and commitment that come from “Taking Action” in the community during the Gold Award project lays the foundation for a lifetime of leadership and philanthropy.

Girls must be in grades 9-12 (or equivalent), be a registered Girl Scout Senior or Ambassador AND complete two Journeys (Senior or Ambassador)* OR earn the Silver Award and complete one Senior or Ambassador Journey.

*Girl Scout Seniors complete Senior Journeys and Girl Scout Ambassadors complete Ambassador Journeys.

  • Choose an issue: Use your values and skills to identify a community issue you care about.
  • Investigate: Research everything you can about the issue.
  • Get help: Invite others to support and take action with you.
  • Create a plan: Create a project plan that achieves sustainable and measurable impact.
  • Present your plan and get feedback: Sum up your project plan for your Girl Scout council. A Girl Scout Proposal must first be submitted in writing and then presented to a volunteer committee prior to project approval
  • Take action: Take the lead to carry out your plan.
  • Educate and inspire: Share what you have experienced with others.
  • Complete and submit your Gold Award Final Report.

In order to participate in the council-wide Girl Scout Gold Award Ceremony, a girl needs to complete her Gold Award, submit a Gold Award Final Report and complete the exit interview no later than March 30. This typically means submitting a final report in February for a March committee meeting.

Below are  information packets, forms and an adult guide for the Girl Scout Gold Award.

Check out our Silver and Gold Award Chat Session videos. More information can be found here.

Check out our new Silver and Gold Award ONLINE Adult Learning Opportunities here!

Girl Scout Religious Awards

My Promise My FaithEverything in Girl Scouting is based on the Girl Scout Promise and Law. The Girl Scout Law includes many of the principles and values common to most faiths. Thus, while a secular organization, Girl Scouts has, since the movement began, encouraged girls to take spiritual journeys via their faiths’ religious recognitions.

Girls of all grade levels can now earn the My Promise, My Faith pin developed by Girl Scouts of the USA. This pin, which girls can earn once a year, complements existing religious recognitions and allows all girls to further strengthen the connection between their faith and Girl Scouts. A girl earns the My Promise, My Faith pin by carefully examining the Girl Scout Law and directly tying it to tenets of her faith. Requirements for this pin are included in The Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting for all levels.

E-mail questions concerning the Girl Scout Bronze, Silver and Gold Award and the Brownie Spark Award.